Health

Pinal County finds first West Nile virus infected mosquitoes of 2022

Posted 8/11/22

During routine seasonal mosquito surveillance this week, the Pinal County Public Health Services District detected West Nile virus positive mosquitoes in the county, according to a press release from …

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Health

Pinal County finds first West Nile virus infected mosquitoes of 2022

Posted

During routine seasonal surveillance this week, the Pinal County Public Health Services District detected West Nile virus positive mosquitoes in the county for the first time this year, according to a press release from Pinal County

“It is especially important for everyone to be vigilant in preventing mosquito breeding and mosquito bites now that we have had some significant monsoon rains,” the release further stated.

As the Pinal County Public Health Services District notes, not all mosquitoes transmit West Nile virus.

Pinal County Environmental Health’s vector control program staff do regular surveillance throughout the county looking for the specific mosquitoes associated with human disease. This data is then used to guide the health district’s disease prevention efforts and help reduce the risk of mosquito-borne disease to Pinal County residents and visitors,” the release stated.

“Last year we had a significant West Nile virus season in Pinal County and statewide. This year, things have progressed more slowly, but it is still important to be vigilant to protect our community, stated Chris Reimus, who manages the county’s Environmental Health program. “Our program focuses on surveillance and source reduction of mosquito breeding areas. If everyone does their share to reduce mosquito breeding in the community, it can go a long way to protect our citizens and their families from disease.” 

Not everyone who gets mosquito-borne diseases has symptoms, but for those who do, some may experience lasting or permanent effects and in the worst cases, the diseases can be fatal. 

Pinal County, West Nile virus, mosquitoes