City Council

Scottsdale designates five programs for SRPMIC grants

Posted 7/3/20

Scottsdale is set to receive over $258,000 from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community in tribal gaming grant funds.

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City Council

Scottsdale designates five programs for SRPMIC grants

Posted

Scottsdale is set to receive over $258,000 from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community in tribal gaming grant funds.

These funds --- which the City Council approved on consent at its June 30 meeting --- will go to five programs and services that serve the general public. With the approval, the city will next work to finalize contracts with the five groups.

The breakdown includes:

  • A New Leaf --- East Valley Men’s Shelter: $40,000;
  • Central Arizona Shelter Services --- Single Adult Shelter: $40,000;
  • Tempe Community Action Agency --- Granite Reef Senior Center Congregate Meals Program: $43,248;
  • Tempe Community Action Agency --- Scottsdale Home Delivered Meals Program: $99,770; and
  • UMOM New Day Center --- Family Emergency Shelter: $25,000.

City staff say all five organizations garnered a recommendation from the Human Services Commission. Staff also say the proposals outlined ways they would serve the more vulnerable parts of the population through food or shelter services.

Funding these programs through SRPMIC grants will free up Scottsdale Cares and General funds for other services.

Per tribal-state gaming compacts, Scottsdale and SRPMIC must act cooperatively to distribute funds to benefit the Scottsdale residents. The compacts charge SRPMIC to share a certain percentage of its gaming revenue for public benefit and 12% of that contribution must go to cities, towns and counties of the tribe’s choosing.

While Scottsdale does use the money to support city-sponsored programs, the tribe may ask it to pass the money to local non-profit organizations for specifically identified services.

Since fiscal year 2013-14, the Human Services Commission directed staff to seek alternative funding sources for food and regional shelter programs outside of community development block grants, Scottsdale Cares and the General Fund.

Since then, the Human Services Commission has annually identified needs and specific purposes for use of the grants and staff makes application to SRPMIC.

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