Opinions

Supervisors respond to judge’s election subpoenas ruling

Posted 3/2/21

Following the ruling issued Friday by Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Timothy Thomason — which affirms the subpoenas issued by Arizona Senate Republicans calling for the release of the …

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Opinions

Supervisors respond to judge’s election subpoenas ruling

Posted

Following the ruling issued Friday by Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Timothy Thomason — which affirms the subpoenas issued by Arizona Senate Republicans calling for the release of the county’s  2.1 million presidential election ballots along with providing access to voting machines and software — members of the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors responded.

Their recent statements on the matter are provided below.

Jack Sellers
Jack Sellers

Chairman Jack Sellers, Dist. 1: “The Board of Supervisors met with its attorneys this afternoon to consider Judge Thomason’s ruling in the case of Maricopa County, et al. v. Karen Fann, et al.
Judge Thomason’s ruling brings clarity to whether Senate subpoenas apply to ballots that, per state law, must be kept private following an election; as well as the many other documents and equipment demanded. We respect his legal opinion and will immediately start working to provide the Arizona Senate with the ballots and other materials. These items are in addition to the more than 11GB of data already provided. We hope senators will show the same respect and care we have for the 2.1 million private ballots and use them in service of their legislative duties.”

Steve Chucri
Steve Chucri

Steve Chucri. Dist. 2: “Judge Thomason’s decision brings much-needed clarity to the question of state law related to the Senate subpoenas and their application to the release of ballots. I am pleased that the Court resolved this issue so that we can all proceed with the business of representing our constituents. I respect the Judge’s decision and look forward to working with the Senate to provide remaining outstanding materials. I was hopeful we all could have resolved this issue without a protracted legal battle, and I was prepared to proceed with our own forensic audit late last year, as my vote reflected. Cooperation between the county and the Legislature benefits our mutual constituencies, not only related to elections law and policy, but on many other fronts. We can achieve better results by working collaboratively.”

Bill Gates
Bill Gates

Bill Gates, Dist. 3: “The judge has spoken. From the beginning, I believed the law required the County Board of Supervisors and the Treasurer to prevent disclosure of your ballots. Contrary to what some have said, Maricopa County has nothing to hide. We want people to have faith and trust in the accuracy and security of our elections. For our part, we have done everything within our power to provide that. Maricopa County has conducted three fully transparent audits, including two forensic audits by independent, qualified and outside Vote System Testing Laboratories. I trust the Senate will be completely transparent with the public as Maricopa County has been. From the beginning, the County sought clarification from the court. The court has ruled. I look forward to working with the Senate to provide them the information they are requesting.”

Clint Hickman
Clint Hickman

Clint Hickman, Dist. 4: “Today members of the Board of Supervisors met with our attorneys to review Judge Thomason’s ruling on the subpoenas from the Arizona State Senate. The board will follow the judge’s opinion and are now working to release your ballots from the 2020 general election to the Senate. Their subpoenas also demand many materials beyond the 11GB of data we have already turned over, and we will provide it. My colleagues and I felt strongly we needed this guidance from the court about the demands in those subpoenas. I continue to believe Maricopa County volunteers and staff conducted a secure election that was free and fair, and I would like to thank them for their hard work.”

Steve Gallardo
Steve Gallardo

Steve Gallardo, Dist. 5: “I am extremely disappointed in today’s ruling. The sanctity of the secret ballots is too important not to appeal Judge Thomason’s ruling. Our 2.1 million citizens who cast their ballots did so with the promise that their vote would be kept private and protected. Any ruling that threatens the secrecy of the ballot and our commitment to voters is concerning. What’s worse is a judge telling us to hand over ballots to a small group of Republican state senators who have been trying to undermine the will of the voters ever since the presidential election didn’t go their way. This is the same group of senators that planned to give these ballots to Rudy Giuliani’s go-to “security expert” for their so-called “independent audit” of the November election. This is the same group of senators pursuing legislation right now to make it more difficult for our citizens, especially low-income individuals, and people of color, to vote. Today’s decision creates a chilling effect across the state of Arizona and will discourage voter participation, which is vital to maintain our democracy. I believe today’s court action and the onslaught of voter suppression bills introduced by the Arizona State Legislature are retrogressive and will discourage voters from casting their ballots.”

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