The University of Pittsburgh acquires August Wilson trove

Posted 10/28/20

NEW YORK (AP) — The University of Pittsburgh has acquired the archive of the late playwright and Pittsburgh native son August Wilson, a trove that contains recordings, letters, artwork, poetry, …

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, subscribers will receive unlimited access to the website, including access to our Daily Independent e-edition, which features Arizona-specific journalism and items you can’t find in our community print products, such as weather reports, comics, crossword puzzles, advice columns and so much more six days a week.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor

The University of Pittsburgh acquires August Wilson trove

Posted

NEW YORK (AP) — The University of Pittsburgh has acquired the archive of the late playwright and Pittsburgh native son August Wilson, a trove that contains recordings, letters, artwork, poetry, unpublished work and notebooks.

The August Wilson Archive will reside in a state-of-the-art home in Hillman Library’s renovated Archives & Special Collections, the university said Thursday. Processing the collection — more than 450 boxes of materials — will start in early 2021.

“This acquisition is about more than bringing August Wilson back home to Pittsburgh,” said Chancellor Patrick Gallagher in a statement. “This archive deftly puts the experiences of Black Americans beneath an intimate magnifying glass and unpacks themes of injustice and inequity that are just as relevant today as when Wilson’s first play debuted."

Wilson died in October 2005 at the age of 60. He is renowned for the characters he put on stage in an ambitious 10-play cycle, nine of them set in Pittsburgh, that recounted the struggle of Blacks in America. He won two Pulitzers and a Tony and is best known for his plays “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,″ ”Fences″ and “The Piano Lesson.”

Highlights of the archive include hundreds of writing tablets and notebooks which contain drafts of dialogue, poetry, artwork and other writing. There are also draft scripts and correspondence with friends and collaborators, including director Lloyd Richards and Claude Purdy, a close friend and colleague who was crucial to Wilson’s later success.

Comments