Russian FM hosts speaker of Libya's east-based parliament

Posted 7/3/20

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's top diplomat met Friday with the speaker of the parliament based in eastern Libya to discuss a political settlement for the conflict-stricken country.

Foreign Minister …

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, subscribers will receive unlimited access to the website, including access to our Daily Independent e-edition, which features Arizona-specific journalism and items you can’t find in our community print products, such as weather reports, comics, crossword puzzles, advice columns and so much more six days a week.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor

Russian FM hosts speaker of Libya's east-based parliament

Posted

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's top diplomat met Friday with the speaker of the parliament based in eastern Libya to discuss a political settlement for the conflict-stricken country.

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said at the start of his talks with parliament speaker Aguila Saleh that Moscow supports a cease-fire proposal brokered by Egypt last month. He emphasized that Russia will reach out to all parties in Libya to help encourage a political settlement.

“Russia has proceeded from the assumption that the Libyan conflict has no military solution, and only the Libyans themselves could settle their differences by political means," Lavrov said.

Libya was plunged into chaos following a NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011. The country has been split between a government in the east allied with military commander Khalifa Hifter and another one in Tripoli in the west supported by the United Nations.

Hifter has been backed by Egypt, Russia, France and the United Arab Emirates, while the Tripoli-allied militias have been aided by Turkey, Qatar and Italy.

Last year, Hifter’s forces launched an offensive trying to capture Tripoli, clashing with an array of militias loosely allied with the government there, but the attack has failed. After making their way deep into the west and fighting in the suburbs of the Libyan capital, Hifter’s forces were driven back by Tripoli-based fighters supported by Turkey.

Comments