Transportation

Phoenix roads may not be ready to resume work commutes

U.S. Chamber study ranks city's roads low among top metros

Posted 7/28/21

When it comes to the roads in Phoenix being able to get people to work, they leave a lot to be desired, according to a new report from the U.s. Chamber of Commerce Foundation.

In a partnership …

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Transportation

Phoenix roads may not be ready to resume work commutes

U.S. Chamber study ranks city's roads low among top metros

Posted

When it comes to the roads in Phoenix being able to get people to work, they leave a lot to be desired, according to a new report from the U.s. Chamber of Commerce Foundation.

In a partnership with Pittsburgh-based RoadBotics, the study used artificial intelligence to assess 75 miles of roads in the nation's 20 largest metro areas. Phoenix ranked tied for last with Detroit.

"Stronger roadway systems get people to jobs, connect businesses to markets and serve major economic arteries,” said Michael Carney, senior vice president of emerging issues at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, in a press release. “This innovative look at America’s roadways highlights the urgent need to improve infrastructure in some of the nation’s most dynamic metropolitan areas, and why keeping our roadways in a state of good repair is critical as the economy picks up steam.”

The system used visual data from smartphone cameras mounted to vehicles to identify pavement problems such as potholes and cracks. RoadBotics used this information to develop a high-definition map of the roads in question.

According to the report, withich looked at roads primarily in the central corridor between Seventh Street and 15th Avenue and from Adams Street to Thomas Road, only 13% of the roads were rated as having the best condition. Another 34.7% were rated as having good condition.

The rest of the roads were rated as a three or worse on a scale of five, giving Phoenix an overall 2.57 score.

The look did not cover any of the Valley's freeways.

Foundation officials have backed transportation and infrastructure as a key component to economic growth.

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