Library of Congress to honor author Colson Whitehead

Posted 7/13/20

NEW YORK (AP) — Colson Whitehead keeps winning awards.

Already and the Orwell Prize for political fiction, Whitehead is now being honored by the Library of Congress. On Monday, it announced that …

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Library of Congress to honor author Colson Whitehead

Posted

NEW YORK (AP) — Colson Whitehead keeps winning awards.

Already and the Orwell Prize for political fiction, Whitehead is now being honored by the Library of Congress. On Monday, it announced that he had won the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction.

Whitehead, 50, is the youngest winner of the lifetime achievement prize, which the library has previously given to Toni Morrison, Philip Roth and Denis Johnson, among others. He is the first author to win Pulitzers for consecutive works of fiction — “The Underground Railroad” and “The Nickel Boys,” for which he won in April.

“As a kid, I’d walk into great New York City libraries like the Schomburg and the Mid-Manhattan, on a field trip or for a school assignment, and feel this deep sense of awe, as if I’d stumbled into a sacred pocket in the city,” Whitehead said in a statement. “I hope that right now there’s a young kid who looks like me, who sees the Library of Congress recognize Black artists and feels encouraged to pursue their own vision and find their own sacred spaces of inspiration.”

On Thursday, Whitehead and Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will discuss race in America as part the video series “Hear You, Hear Me,” which airs at 7 p.m. EDT. The conversation will be available at 7 p.m. on the Library’s Facebook and YouTube channels and .

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Online: https://go.usa.gov/xwuFk.

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