Local Elections

Voter Guide: Litchfield elementary school board election FAQ

Posted 10/7/22

This fall, Arizona voters will have some big decisions to make at the ballot box at the statewide level. But they will also have some important decisions to make at the local level, including …

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Local Elections

Voter Guide: Litchfield elementary school board election FAQ

Posted

This fall, Arizona voters will have some big decisions to make at the ballot box at the statewide level. But they will also have some important decisions to make at the local level, including deciding who will represent public schools in their districts. 

At Independent Newsmedia, we believe local democracy is important, and strive to provide voters with the best possible information from gubernatorial races down to local school boards.

Below are answers to common questions voters might have ahead of the general election.  

Who is on my school board ballot? Voters in School District #79 will have the opportunity to vote for two candidates in the Litchfield Elementary School District governing board race. Incumbents Kimberly Moran and Dr. Dennis Dowling will appear on the ballot alongside newcomer Ryan Owens.  

What is the purpose of a school board? A school board is made up of officials (either elected or appointed) who help make decisions that impact the public schools in their district. School boards meet publicly to form the district’s overall mission and goals as well as school policies and practices. They are responsible for hiring and evaluating the district superintendent, approving and monitoring budgets and approving curriculum materials, among other things. Click here for information on school boards. In Maricopa County, school board members typically serve four-year terms.There are five school board members on the LESD governing board including the board president. LESD school board members are unpaid.

How do I know what school district I live in? You can find out what school district you live in by visiting the Maricopa County Interactive Elections Map. Click ‘OK’ when you see a pop-up on the screen, and type your home address into the address bar on the left of the screen. Then, click on ‘school districts’ below the address bar, which should tell you the name of the school district where you live.

Can I still register to vote? You have until October 11 to register to vote. Click here to register to vote online. Generally, U.S. citizens who are or will be 18 years of age by the next election can register to vote. There are exceptions. Visit the Arizona Clean Elections website for details.

What if I’m unsure if I’m already registered to vote? You need to register to vote every time you move, change your name, or if you want to update your party affiliation. You can check your voter registration status by visiting the Secretary of State’s Arizona Voter Information Portal. If you need assistance, call 1-877-THE-VOTE.

Where can I vote in person or drop off my ballot? You can search for polling and drop box locations nearest you by clicking here. This search engine will also provide information on hours of operation. You can download a full list of polling locations here.

What will I need to bring with me to the polls? If you are voting in person, you will need to bring proof of your identity and address. You can bring one of the following:

  • Valid Arizona driver's license
  • Valid Arizona non-operating identification card
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
  • Valid United States federal, state, or local government-issued identification (like a passport)

Don’t have one of the above forms of ID? Click here for additional ways to provide proof of identity and address at the polls. 

Note: The information on your proof of identity must match the information you provided when you last registered to vote. For example, if you had a recent name or address change not reflected on your ID, you should bring along an alternative form of ID. 

Do I need an ID to drop off my mail-in ballot at a ballot drop box location? No, you do not need to show any ID to drop off your ballot at a drop box location. You can also skip past people waiting in line to vote in-person.

When does early voting begin? Early in-person voting begins Wednesday, October 12 and ends Friday, November 4. Click here for a list of early voting locations. 

Can I still request a ballot by mail in time for the general election? If you are a registered voter, you can join the Active Early Voting List (AEVL) or request a ballot-by-mail until Friday, October 28, 2022, 11 days before the general election. If you miss this deadline, you can still join the AEVL at any time to participate in future elections. Click here to join the AEVL by updating your voter registration online. Click here to request a one-time ballot-by mail online (by choosing this option, you will not be automatically added to the AEVL.) Click here for alternative ways to request a ballot by mail.

When should I send in my ballot-by-mail? If you received a ballot-by-mail, you should send it back no later than Tuesday, November 1. If you miss this deadline, consider dropping your ballot off at a polling place or ballot drop-box location no later than 7 p.m. on Tuesday, November 8.  

What happens if my ballot did not arrive or it has been lost or damaged? If you have not received your ballot, or it has been lost or damaged, contact the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office at (602) 506-1511 or email evreq@risc.maricopa.gov. If you don’t have enough time to wait for a new ballot, consider voting in person

How can I track the status of my ballot? The Maricopa County Elections Department provides the option of a voter dashboard, email or text alerts to help voters track the status of their ballot. Click here for information. If you’d like to track the status of your provisional ballot click here. (More information on provisional ballots below).

What if I lost my voter ID card? Registered voters can visit the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office website and fill in the form to immediately obtain a digital voter ID card. You can show your digital voter ID to a poll worker on your mobile device when voting in person. You can also print the page out and bring it with you to the polls.  Note: You do not need to show your voter ID card at the polls if you provide a valid federal, state or tribal identification. Click here for information on what to bring to the polls.

Have an election question you don't see answered here? Send us an email at mackley@iniusa.org 

Quick Links:

Register to vote | Check your voter registration status  | Update your voter registration | Join the Active Early Voting List | Request a one-time ballot-by-mail | Your school district boundaries | Information on school boards | Important election dates and deadlines | Where to vote in-person | Where to drop off mail-in ballot in person | What to bring to the polls | Print my voter ID card | Get a digital voter ID card | Track your ballot | Track your provisional ballot  | Información en español