Glendale Planning Commission to review controversial Allen Ranches rezone Thursday

Independent Newsmedia
Posted 6/2/20

The Glendale Planning Commission is considering a rezone and two general plan amendments for an 865-acre property causing controversy in the Southwest Valley during its 6 p.m. meeting Thursday at the …

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Glendale Planning Commission to review controversial Allen Ranches rezone Thursday

Posted

The Glendale Planning Commission is considering a rezone and two general plan amendments for an 865-acre property causing controversy in the Southwest Valley during its 6 p.m. meeting Thursday at the Glendale Civic Center, 5750 W. Glenn Drive.

Watch the meeting live or later on the city's Youtube channel or Facebook page. View the meeting's agenda here.

The Allen Ranches development, northwest of Loop 303 and Camelback Road, plans to use 615 acres for industrial, commercial and office use and 250 acres for a housing development. The property, on county land, is seeking annexation into Glendale but council members have shown uncertainty on whether they want to add it to the city.

Nearby residents protested the development in written statements read at a Glendale City Council meeting last month chiefly because they believe the houses will be packed too densely to blend in with the surrounding neighborhoods and because it will create a Glendale city island surrounded by county land.

When county property is annexed into a city, under state law it automatically transfers to the most similar zoning and general plan designations the city has to what it was zoned for by the county. Allen Ranches is seeking a rezone and general plan change upon its annexation into Glendale, as do most properties Glendale annexes.

The developers seek to change 117 acres from residential use to industrial use under the general plan. Another proposed general plan amendment seeks to allow for more density in the 250 acres planned for the housing development, increasing the maximum density from 2.5 dwelling units per acre to 3.5 units per acre.

The 250-acre planned housing development is also seeking a rezone from rural residential to a custom Planned Area Development zoning. A document submitted to the city by the developers says the PDA will cap the density at 3.3 units per acre and will cap the total amount of dwelling units on the 250-acre property at 819. It notes that the ultimate number of residential lots, lot sizes and density will not be finalized until later in the zoning process when the preliminary plat is submitted.

If these changes are approved by the Planning Commission, Glendale City Council is scheduled to review the general plan, zoning changes and vote on whether to annex the property Tuesday, June 23.

Thursday the commission will also consider zoning and/or general plan changes for six other much smaller, less controversial properties up for annexation, all in Glendale’s western region. It will also consider a rezone and general plan change for a planned eight-acre shopping center at 83rd and Glendale avenues.

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